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20130125
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 22, 2013 10:00pm PST
address. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort.
PBS
Jan 23, 2013 10:00pm PST
showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signalehe'll reach out to new ntrist partythat made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliament. and
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 11:00pm PST
vision of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's say
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 10:00pm PST
inaugural package. hotel and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black pr
PBS
Jan 19, 2013 11:30am PST
. >> the president's approval ratings are higher than at any time since he was first elected. >> and the polls are with the prident. but you make the most important point. nra has had this game all to themselves. they have been able to play it with no money in the game, on the side of people who wanted some sense of gun safety. now with people like gabby giffords, people who can attract funds and target them strategically i think the game is -- >> the president has the national -- we have more power than nra but i believe you were right from the standpoint and being a person who makes law people should come to ts table find out what they do agree on instead of politicizing it. it is a political issue. i think leaders should come together and stop the bipartisan -- with enyou have the nra saying we're against an assault weapons ban, against everything. to me the nra has become nothing more than a shield for the gun manufacturers. if you find out where their finances are coming it's true. they get their membership dues for sure but they get huge monies from gun manufacturers. they're in th
PBS
Jan 20, 2013 8:30am PST
credible. for instance, in the election that happened last year, the leader of the environmental movement in brazil was a very successful candidate, got 20% of the election, for bringing those sueso thtabl a pew research center that was concluded in 2010 has shown that the brazilian people is the people that worries most in the world about climate change. >> hinojosa: really? >> 84% of brazilians think that climate change is a serious issue. >> hinojosa: is that because so much of it is talked about? >> yes. and because, you know, there is an awareness that we have, you know, all this wealth. this is ours, the amazon is ours, and also of eight countries that share the amazon with us. and we have here a resource that's very precious. the threat to the amazon today, you're talking about cattle, cattle ranching. there is now in the amazon cities, et cetera, that want to have the green seal of approval. >> hinojosa: let me ask you before we finish, paulo, because in... even in the area of boston, where we record this show, you have a large population of brazilians. you have... they produce 20
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 5:00pm PST
. >>> israelis are preparing to vote in a general election. opinion polls suggest they'll keep prime minister benjamin netanyahu in power. netanyahu called early elections in october after his coalition failed to agree on the annual budget. his likud party and his nationalist coalition party israel betananu have led in the polls. the party opposes peace talks with the palestinians. netanyahu resumed the building of jewish settlements in occupied territories two years ago. the construction breaches international law and contributed to a breakdown in the peace process. >>> the prime minister has devoted quite a bit of time urging the bank of japan to do something. what's he hoping for? >> the prime minister has been very adamant about getting japan out of deflation. he doesn't feel his administration can do that task alone. that's why he's asking for simultaneously monetary action. the policy makers are about to give abe what he's been pushing for the bank of japan officials will likely announce a 2% inflation target. the target is part of abe's plan to tackle inflation with bolder, monetary ea
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 10:00pm PST
tonight's daily download, we look back at the 2012 election and ahead to the inauguration with the obama campaign's internet guru, harper reed. >> we basically built what amounted to an ad-tech company, but instead of targeting ads on the internet, of course we did that, we really maximized the targeting that's physical. what that means is we're not wasting anyone's time. >> brown: and we examine the fallout from tour de france champion lance armstrong's admission that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama called today for what amounts to a nional akening to stop gun deaths in america. he detailed an action plan, all the while acknowledging that the most far-reaching measures face tough goin
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 9:00pm PST
. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's capitol of the united states of america. we shouldn't have the worst school system. we should have the best. >> are you ready? all right. >> almost everyone expected fenty to choose a seasoned veteran to turn the schools around, but he chose a virtual unknown. >> good mornin >> rhee began by introducing herself to students... >> i'm excited to be here today. >> ...and teachers, giving them a glimpse of her forthright style. >> i am michelle rhee. i am the new chancellor of the dc public schools. and just in case there was any confusion, i am in fact korean, i am 37 years old, and, no, i have never run a school district before. >> although rhee had never run a school district, she had worked in school reform for ten years, and warned fenty that sweeping change could politically costly.
PBS
Jan 18, 2013 5:30pm PST
was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular, is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc, cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapons ban, that's too far. but i am for some other things. and so i think they will chop
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 9:00pm PST
is held hostage? >> we would say broken because lots of energy goes into electing these senators individually and then the results are almost nothing. so that's why we would say broken. you could definitely say it's held hostage. but we would say broken because i think regardless of how the deck is, stacks up, republicans, independents and democrats it should not function this way. i mean, we really do believe that. you know, we think our members and working people in this country and most americans would say it's fair. people get elected. at some point, the majority should rule. and that's the way it is in every other democracy in the world. >> but as we talk what's up with harry reid? he does seem to be backing away from the strong reform that you propose. i brought a story from talkingpointsmemo.com. senate majority leader harry reid is voicing support for a set of changes to the current filibuster rules that would fall far short of the more sweeping proposals from people like mr. cohen. what's he -- what's up? >> well, i think part of what's up is he's got four or five mocrat
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 11:00pm PST
lo at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real refos. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthox and traworthodox an thoho are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beliefs, and which people enj
PBS
Jan 23, 2013 11:00pm PST
look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the count h moved dramically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american nsulate in benghazi, libya. four amerins we killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized h
PBS
Jan 20, 2013 10:00am PST
their eyes and through the young people that i serve and my sense is in this election, the most recent election, that the future of our country kind of showed up and voted in a way that no one was really expecting that they would given what you surmised which was a sense of perhaps disillusionment or in the professor's words, the revival being over. but in fact, i think they came back more seasoned, more realistic, more determined to do the hard work to bring about the kind of political consensus that we need and particularly in the state of maryland, if you look at the two issues that were passed on referendum the religious communities, the immigrant communities, people of color, they all came together in ways that totally surprised the expectations given what was perceived to be such a mood of pessimism, even just months before. >> what about you, professor trulear? do you sense any little glimmer of hope anywhere that things can be better? >> oh, i think there's a lot of hope. i think that it's just more grounded in reality, which is, i think, the gist of the bishop's comment
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 11:00pm PST
everything. >> rose: and what did it change for you? >> y know, i got elected in '94 and i'm sure you remember, charlie, in 1993 you had waco, you also had ruby ridge, you had a couple of incidences, tragedies, that really inflamed the right and made gun ownership far more symbolic. for me, though, over the past year it wasn't just newtown, though newtown was really the final straw for me, the tragedy of that day, it was also the fact that a realization as a parent that it's not safe now to send our children to schools or to send them to malls or even movie theaters or religious services. that what once was the exception is now becoming the rule. we can expect these type of mass shootings as a part of american life and i personally believe it's a combination of many things frfrplt violent american culture to mental health issues to gun issues. i think that's one of three issues. ideologues on both sides will disagree with -- take exception to one or two of those problems, but for me that is not about symbolism anymore, it's about saving children's lives and if it's true that dick
PBS
Jan 22, 2013 5:00pm PST
their parliamentary election. prime minister benjamin netanyahu has already claimed victory. but exit polls suggest he'll be governing with a weaker mandate. the polls indicate that a right-wing bloc led by netanyahu's likud party will remain the largest camp in parliament. but it lost ground to an alliance of center-left parties. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for the third time. our biggest challenge remains preventing iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. >> centrist party yesh atid is likely to become the second largest parliamentary force. the center-left labor party is projected to come third. the ultranationalist habayi habayit hayudi looks to secure its number of seats. the party opposes peace talks with palestinians. centrist parties have performed better than expected. some voters may have been worried by the country's tilt to the right. netanyahu is expected to begin negotiations with other parties to form a coalition. but it won't be easy. the gap between the two blocs will be narrow. >>> japanese researchers have refashioned some of the b
PBS
Jan 20, 2013 1:00pm PST
electing a new president directly for the first time. duringis 10 years in power, klaus often angered his european partners with his euro skeptics commons. now, he is making a final grand gesture. >> watching televised images of amnestied convicts leaving prison as free citizens. the same people he says are responsible for his losing everything he worked so hard for. now he will be in debt for the rest of his life. >> i will tell you quite openly and with some bitterness i'm no friend of amnesty's like this. it is a sweeping amnesty that is not just affect small-time hoods. at least 120 really big fish who have thousands of victims. >> in the late 1990's, he had a house bill. he paid some 100,000 euros but only got a bear shell. the managers took the money out of the construction company and let it go bankrupt. he had to sink another $100,000 into finishing the house. but that was not all. he feels cheated by the bankruptcy trustee who required him to pay another $100,000 to free the house from bankruptcy. that ruined him. >> i have to come up with some 100,000 euros for the house every m
PBS
Jan 23, 2013 4:30pm PST
which says any changes congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better vote for it because you have a mortgage payment due. >> reporter: senate democrats said they would pass the debt ceiling extension and they also promised to pass a budget which is sure to be very different than the one house republicans produce this spring. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: in the engine that is the global economy, europe continues to be the break. while the u.s. emerging markets and even japan are expected to see slow but study growth this year, the eurozone will shrink for the second year in a row. in an updated prediction, the i.m.f. forest the global economy to growth 3.5%. that's down slightly from its earlier prediction back in october, thanks in part to the recession continuing in europe. oliveer blargchard joins us. are the policies addressing the recession not work
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 11:00pm PST
regime has no legitimacy because last year it was overthrown. the democratic elected president of mali was overthro byroops who had been trained by american trainers, now there is an interim government. i mean if you can look at the government of mali, i mean it's so bad it makes the government in kabul look good by comparison. i mean this is a very dysfunctional regime that has a hard time winning the support of its people. so along with the security, you have to enhance the legitimacy of the regime so that people in the north will be able to turn away even if there is a security offensive into the north. even if the french are able to make gains in the north they're to the going to win the support of the people unless they're championing me kd of governme that those people respect and right now understandably they have zero respect for the government, which exacerbated by the fact that the people in the north are twareg and you have black africans there is a lot of tribal ethnic, various other divisions. so you have to have an international push to create a more inclusive government
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 10:00pm PST
. gabrielle giffords aims to raise $20 million for the 2014 midterm elections. the n.r.a. is obviously, as you mentioned, going to be adding to their membership, getting more fund raising so this is a battle and a place where they can take out intense positions. >> sreenivasan: how about putting this in terms of perspective inerms of 2014, 2016? even the vice president why he decided to come out on good deal but is on almost a road tour. he seems to be campaigning for both gun rights and gun control or sun safety as well as maybe for himself. >> well, the presidential race, of course, we just inaugurated president obama for his second term. we've seen action shifts to the states. you have democratic governors making moves on this. andrew cuomo in new york is taking the lead. he could run for president. the vice president is not making it secret that he could be running for president as well so he's th front ma on thi major issue that the president will be talking about. so none of this is without politics in mind. the money does matter, the momentum on this matters when you'r
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 8:00am PST
on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the un
PBS
Jan 22, 2013 11:00pm PST
all three of them. >> rose: i know you will. >> the re-election really sert fies the legacy. think if he wasn't elected. maybe obamacare would have been undone in congress. abortion rights might have gone backwards. now we are sure they will not under his administration. con tra ception will be out there. the sense that the country can move in the direction that he was trying to move it which goes back to what we've been saying all along that collective action can produce individual help. might have been shifted in the other direction had he not won. so everything he accomplished i think is multiplied by the fact that he won that reelection. it's human. bigger than it seemed at the time. >> rose: in fact, he has said, in the last several mths that this victory was as much, was as important not more important because in fact it was a referendum on what he had done before in the first four year. >> absolutely. >> rose: okay bob i leave it to you to sort of sum up the first term. >> first of all i think the real questions are what has he learned and how has he grown. and we're only going
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 5:30pm PST
president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that personith any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who sometimes will have aggressi
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)